Review of a Sky Without Stars by Linda S. Clare

Leah Courtney
A Sky Without Stars is yet another book in the Quilts of Love series I've been enjoying. I was pretty disappointed in this one however.

The story is very flat to read. There's not much thinking and introspection to help readers get to know the characters. I didn't feel as if I connected with them at all. I also felt as if the story was sort of disjointed. It didn't seem to progress logically and smoothly. As an example, there is a point in the story where one character receives a note from the other. We know the content of the note because we know the other character's point of view. But after the note is received, the chapter ends and the next begins with no indication of the character receiving the note or her response. Instead the action picks up somewhere else, and we are left wondering.

This just wasn't my favorite in this series. I have enjoyed reading all of the different stories from all of the different authors. You can read below to find out more about this one.

Disclosure: I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.



This week, the
Christian Fiction Blog Alliance
is introducing
A Sky Without Stars
Abingdon Press (February 18, 2014)
by
Linda S. Clare
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Linda S. Clare is an award-winning author and coauthor of several books and has also published many essays, stories, and poems in publications, including The Christian Reader, The Denver Post, and The Philadelphia Inquirer. Her most recent book is A Sky without Stars, the newest release in Abingdon’s Quilts of Love line. Born in Arizona, Linda and her husband now make their home in Eugene, Oregon, where Linda has taught college-level creative writing classes, and writes, edits, and mentors other writers. She also is a frequent writing conference presenter, a church retreat leader, and mom to four grown children and five wayward cats.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Frankie Chasing Bear is caught between cultures. She wants to raise her son Harold to revere his Lakota heritage, but she also thinks he will need to learn the white man’s ways to succeed. After the untimely death of her husband, Frankie joins the U.S. Government’s Relocation Program and moves to Arizona. There she begins sewing a Lakota Star pattern quilt for Harold with tribal wisdom sung, sewn, and prayed into it. A bed without a quilt is like a sky without stars, but neither the quilt—nor her new life—comes easily to Frankie. Nick Vandergriff, for instance, is the last man Frankie wants to trust. He’s half-Lakota but Christian, and Frankie can see no good coming from that faith after her own parents were forced to convert at an Indian school. Can Nick convince Frankie that white men and Christians aren’t all bad? And will Frankie learn that love is the most important ingredient—for her son’s quilt and life itself?


If you would like to read the first chapter of A Sky Without Stars, go HERE.

Leah Courtney / Author & Editor

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