Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World by Kristen Welch

Those of us who live in America or any other affluent country have many blessings and privileges. Even those of us who live on one income and scrimp and save with not much splurging are incredibly rich compared to much of the world. As a parent, I constantly deal with the fact that my children who are growing up in a world where it's common place for everyone to have a television set, electronic devices, and many other conveniences, are often not conscious of how very much they do have. But I also have to admit that I'm often ungrateful.

Review of nonfiction, parenting book Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World


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Kristen Welch, blogger at We Are That Family, looks at this topic in her recent book: Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World. Using resources and information from other authors as well as her own family's experiences, Kristen explores why our kids (and sometimes we ourselves) have adopted this attitude of entitlement. Then she shares some of the ways that she and her husband have worked on developing gratefulness in their family.

I found myself identifying with much as I read. I agree that there is a very real danger that making things easy for our kids now, giving them what they- or we- think they deserve, is harmful in the long run. Kristen is approaching the situation from the perspective of a Christian worldview. This means bringing our focus from being self-centered to being Christ-centered. It's something I know we need to work on in our family.

Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World is an easy book to read. Kristen's style is conversational, and she's sharing her experiences as a fellow parent, not as an expert who is writing about how her family has it all together and is doing it all right. There were ideas throughout the book that I found myself nodding in agreement to. There were decisions she and her husband have made that we've also made in our family. And there were some things we don't necessarily do, but that caused me to think and evaluate.

I was also impressed by how practical the book is. Again, it's not some lofty parenting manual. It's a book written by a real mom about real life struggles her family has had and real life ideas they've tried to make things better.

I can definitely recommend the book. It's one I'm sure I'll refer to again. You can find Raising Grateful Kids in an Entitled World on Amazon here.



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