Review of Lethal Harvest: Medical Suspense from William Cutrer and Sandra Glahn

Lethal Harvest is a republish of the original, published in 2000. It's interesting because the author talks about the need to update the technology used by the book's characters. There were still some places where you could notice that computers and other technology were different, but, overall, the update was very well done.

Christian fiction review
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From the book's synopsis:

In order to save the president's life, a brilliant embryologist-- the president's nephew--made a "devil's bargain" with a secret group of federal agents. But Tim Sullivan's illegal genetic manipulations of human embryos place everyone he knows at risk. Before he can finish his work, a freakish accident kills him and leaves only troubling questions behind.

Now his partner, Ben McKay, and Tim's widow, Marnie, must uncover the hidden truth about Tim's research before more lives are swept away. In the process, they're forced to face their feelings for each other and the dark secrets in their own pasts. This story of love, loss, and danger crosses international borders from Mexico to the former Soviet Union in order to answer one searing question: if Tim's research is completed, what form will the strange and dangerous harvest take?

Ambition, jealousy, and the ultimate meaning of love move this riveting story through the dark labyrinth that may lie buried under breakthroughs in genetic research and cloning.

Lethal Harvest was fast-paced and interesting. The characters were compelling, and I was drawn into their story easily. Because so much was happening with not much lag time, it was pretty easy to keep reading and not want to put the book down until I found out what was going to happen.

The characters were not extremely well-developed. There was more action and dialogue than actual thoughts and feelings of the characters. But because the book was fast moving and had quite a bit of action, this was okay. It worked with the story line in this book.

I didn't understand some of the science involved, but, having read the author's notes, it was interesting to note that the procedures and things done in the book are possible. It's crazy to think that research could really be going on that is similar to that in the plot of the book.

The story line was occasionally choppy. Things seemed to happen suddenly without much build up. And the conclusion happened a little too conveniently. But, all in all, it was an interesting quick read that had action, drama, suspense, and a little bit of romance.

I give it 3.5 stars. You can find the book on Kregel here or on Amazon here.




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